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The Interpretive Theory of Translation

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Native listeners and readers are usually not aware of cognitive complements. Verbal, situational, cognitive contexts and knowledge of the world come into play quite naturally, while language alone seems to be present.

The interpretative theory of translation (TIT) or theory of meaning (in French, Théorie interprétative de la traduction or Théorie du sens) is the first theory in the field of translatology that focuses on the cognitive or mental process of interpreters and translators and states that interpretations or translations do not take place between languages, but between texts and discourses, hence the focus on understanding the meaning of a message between oral or written texts.

The Interpretive Theory of Translation (ITT) is a concept from the field of Translation Studies, which divides the process of translation into three stages: comprehension, deverbalization, and reformulation.

This theory postulates three main phases during the process of interpretation or translation: comprehension of the message, deverbalisation of the linguistic elements and re-formulation of the message with elements of the target language.

Interpretation can be universally defined as understanding speech and rewording that understanding in a different language. Theoretically, interpreting requires a faultless command of both the source and target languages, a deep insight of the subject matter and mastery of the correct methodology needed to carry out the interpreting process.

 

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